The Journal of Peer Production - New perspectives on the implications of peer production for social change New perspectives on the implications of peer production for social change
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03 Feb

CfP JoPP Special Issue #12: The Institutionalization of Shared Machine Shops: New Spaces, Networks + Practices.

Editors Kat Braybrooke, Adrian Smith Summary Two years ago, a special issue of the Journal of Peer Production on shared machine shops described them as the “occupied factories of peer production theory”. The authors of that issue compiled a theoretically-grounded and empirically informed analysis of member-owned spaces like hacklabs, hackerspaces and

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15 Nov

CfP JoPP special issue #11: CITY – abstracts due 31 January 2017

Editors: Penny Travlou, Nicholas Anastasopoulos, Panayotis Antoniadis Call for papers One of the welfare state’s key jurisdictions was to tend to housing and public space in benevolent ways. However, under the neoliberal dogma, commodification and gentrification threatens both the right to housing and the right to the city while in

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04 Jun

Peer production and work

Editors: Mathieu O’Neil (University of Canberra), Stefano Zacchiroli (University Paris Diderot) The rise in the usage and delivery capacity of the Internet in the 1990s has led to the development of massively distributed online projects where self-governing volunteers collaboratively produce public goods. Notable examples include Free and Open Source Software

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21 Mar

Announcing En Defensa del Software Libre Nr. 2

Two articles from the Journal of Peer Production have been translated and published in En Defensa del Software Libre Nr. 2, available in hardcopy as well as in epub for ebook readers and in pdf for self-printing. This issue is dedicated to peer production, or how free software’s mode of

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08 Dec

Alternative Internets

Editors: Félix Tréguer (ISCC-CNRS), Panayotis Antoniadis (NetHood), Johan Söderberg (Göteborgs Universitet) States are attempting to consolidate their control over the Internet, turning it into an instrument for minute surveillance, whilst a handful of tech-corporations seek to use it as a means to manipulate human behaviour toward their own objectives and

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17 Jul

Feminism and (Un)Hacking

Editors: Shaowen Bardzell, Lilly Nguyen, Sophie Toupin There has been a recent growth in interest in feminist approaches to practices like hacking, tinkering, geeking and making. What started off as an interest in furthering representations of women in the technical fields of computer science and engineering, often along the lines

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16 Sep

Peer production, disruption and the law

Editors: Steve Collins, Macquarie University and Angela Daly, Swinburne University of Technology The disruption caused by new technologies and non-conventional methods of organisation have posed challenges for the law, confronting regulators with the need to balance justice with powerful interests. Experience from the “disruptions” of the late 20th century has

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13 Aug

Shared Machine Shops: Beyond Local Prototyping and Manufacturing

Editors: Maxigas (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya), Peter Troxler (International Fab Lab Association, Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences) In the last years we have witnessed an incredible proliferation of shared machine shops in a confusing number of genres: hackerspaces, makerspaces, Fab Labs and their more commercial counterparts such as TechShops, co-working

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04 Dec

Value and Currency in Peer Production

Edited by: Nathaniel Tkacz, Nicolás Mendoza and Francesca Musiani. Peer production has often been described as a ‘third mode of production’, irreducible to State or market imperatives. The creation and organisation of peer projects takes place without ‘managerial commands or price signals’, without recourse to bureaucratic apparatuses or the logic

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21 Jun

The Critical Power of Free Software: from Intellectual Property to Epistemologies?

Edited by: Maurizio Teli and Vincenzo D’Andrea From the perspective of social organization, Free Software can be conceived as a form of critique by adaptability and modifiability, as pointed out by anthropologist Christopher Kelty [Two Bits, 2008], standing outside institutionalized forms of power and providing working alternatives as critical tools.

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